A vis­it to Sterk­fontein Caves starts with a fas­ci­nat­ing muse­um dis­play of cave for­ma­tions and geol­o­gy, ear­ly life forms, mam­mals and hominid fos­sils, among oth­er topics.

Here you will be intro­duced to Mrs Ples”, the Taung Child” and Lit­tle Foot” before head­ing under­ground to explore the caves, where sci­en­tists have dis­cov­ered many hominid and oth­er ani­mal fos­sils dat­ing back more than 4-mil­lion years to the birth of humanity.

Guid­ed tours of the caves take place every half-hour, sev­en days a week.

Be sure to wear com­fort­able shoes. The cave tour is not suit­able for peo­ple who suf­fer from claus­tro­pho­bia. Due to the nature of the caves, the tour is regret­tably not wheel­chair friendly.

Exhi­bi­tion Highlights

The sci­en­tif­ic exhi­bi­tion cen­tre show­cas­es a recon­struc­tion of a mined cave (ver­sus a pris­tine cave), cave for­ma­tions and geol­o­gy, ear­ly life forms, mam­mals and hominid fos­sils. It describes in detail impor­tant finds such as Mrs Ples”, the Taung Child” and Lit­tle Foot”, as well as pro­vid­ing infor­ma­tion about fos­sil­i­sa­tion, palaeob­otany and landscapes.

World-acclaimed and award-win­ning palaeoartist, John Gurche, whose exhibits can be seen at the Smith­son­ian Insti­tute, the Field Muse­um and the Amer­i­can Muse­um of Nat­ur­al His­to­ry in New York and who worked on the film Juras­sic Park, has pro­duced all the life­like hominid illus­tra­tions, from the 7-mil­lion-year-old Toumai fos­sil from Chad, through to mod­ern humans.