WATER CONSERVATION TECHNOLOGY AT MAROPENG TO SOFTEN THE BLOW OF POTENTIAL WATER TARIFF HIKE

  • April 02, 2012

The hospitality and leisure industry will be among those industries most affected by the potential increase in water tariffs announced by the Department of Water Affairs last week.

“Greg McManus, Managing Director of the Heritage Environmental Rating Programme, predicts that water costs will rise as much as 45% over the next two years,” says Tony Rubin, Managing Director at Maropeng. “This will mean not only a considerable increase in cost to those who have not started implementing conservation initiatives but could also mean a potential loss in  consumer support as consumers move towards supporting businesses that are actively making use of green initiatives. Unfortunately the latest water hike announcement also comes at a time when as a country we have been hit by increased fuel and energy costs, and the introduction of e-tolling costs in Gauteng,” adds Rubin.

Although the construction of the ozone wastewater purification system at the Sterkfontein Caves and Maropeng’s artificial Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetland System was implemented as a sustainability initiative to assist in the conservation of water, it will most certainly assist Maropeng in reducing water costs when the tariff increases come into effect.

The ozone wastewater purification system at Sterkfontein uses ozone from the atmosphere to accelerate the breaking down of solids by bacteria and also to sterilise water. It has been designed to replace Sterkfontein’s septic tanks and provide a far more eco-friendly solution to waste management in the area. The artificial wetland system at Maropeng’s Visitor Centre has been specially designed to naturally assist in the filtering and cleansing of the site’s grey and black water. It has been in existence at Maropeng since it first opened and was constructed in order to conserve energy by minimising the site’s reliance on sewage processing plants.

“According to the World Wildlife Fund, 11 out of 19 water management areas in South Africa have water supply problems and 12 to14 million South Africans do not have access to safe drinking water. If we do not find ways to manage our water supplies effectively we could run out of drinking water before 2040,” concludes Rubin.

COMPILED ON BEHALF OF MAROPENG BY CATHY FINDLEY PUBLIC RELATIONS. FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT NICOLLE KAIRUZ ON (011) 463 6372 OR  NICOLLE@FINDLEYPR.CO.ZA.

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